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71+ Million User Volunteer Platform to Launch Blockchain-Based DApp

Reportedly the world’s largest volunteer service platform, Zhiyuan Hui, has announced its partnership with crypto startup EveriToken.

Chinese non-profit Zhiyuan Hui — reportedly the world’s largest volunteer service platform — has announced its partnership with token economy infrastructure firm EveriToken. The news was announced Jan. 12 in an official EveriToken blog post.

As of December 2018, Zhiyuan Hui reportedly serves over 430,000 non-profits, and its 71 million users are reported to have worked over 100 million service hours via its platform. According to the blog post, the United Nations-issued China Volunteer Service Economic Value Measurement Report has valued the platform at over $500 million.

In order to manage this astonishing volume of users and service hours, Zhiyuan Hui has reportedly decided to build a transparent volunteer tracking platform on the EveriToken public blockchain.

Via the new system, governments, enterprises and non-profits will be able to award an estimated almost one million volunteers per day with “Yi Coin” points in exchange for their volunteer activity and service hours.

Volunteer data will be recorded on-chain onto what EveriToken terms an “open public welfare ledger.” The blog post continues to outline that:

“[T]he everiToken-based system provides audit trails for various stakeholders with access rights, including governments and funders, eliminating the possibility of fraud for the various poverty alleviation projects and government foundation subsidy programs managed by Zhiyuan Hui.”

Yi Coins can reportedly already be used to buy basic goods — such as food, electronics and hygiene products — from almost 100 unmanned retail locations, using EveriToken’s micropayments solution.

At press time, Zhiyuan Hui has not responded to Cointelegraph’s request for comment on the partnership.

As previously reported, the benefits of distributed, transparent ledgers are being increasingly recognized in the public welfare and charitable sectors globally. Last month, the Irish Red Cross partnered to use blockchain in a new app that improves transparency for charitable donations. Also last month, Binance’s philanthropic arm launched its own blockchain-powered donation platform.

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Bitcoin Price Analysis: BTC Losses Coincide with China’s New Policies

  • Bitcoin Price slow down after sinking 10 percent
  • China introduces new privacy quashing blockchain rules
  • Trading volumes steady but bearish

Even though today’s losses are low, there is hope for traders as long as Bitcoin prices are oscillating above $3,700. Drops below this minor support line could trigger sells towards $3,220 or lower in the next few days.

Bitcoin Price Analysis

At spot prices, Bitcoin is down 3.8 percent in the past 24 hours but stable in the last hour. The coin is flat and trading within a tight trade range contrary to yesterday’s rapidity.

From candlestick arrangement, we expect prices to cool down and even expand towards $4,000 before bears wash down gains in the direction of Jan 10 losses while reaffirming bear trend continuation as spelled by the price action of mid-November and early Dec 2018. Our short-term bullish trend is valid and until after there is a clean break and close below $3,700, there is hope for BTC long traders.

Fundamentals

Different governments have different views on cryptocurrencies. To meet popular demand, some are opening doors and even allowing exchanges to self-regulate. Countries like Japan are very open, embracing new technology while others are not interested in the application of blockchain to create competing, censor resistant currencies.

When everything is said and done, it’s all about control and China, as we know, is strict. Although we understand their companies are leaders in crypto, filling patents rivaling those from the US and Europe, the country is against the proliferation of Bitcoin and crypto. However, they see a future in the blockchain. That is why the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) is releasing a new document detailing new regulation that crypto and blockchain companies must adhere with.

Once it becomes law by Feb 19,2019, blockchain companies would divulge log user activities on request, allow authorities access to private data and even reveal groups or individuals behind secret or anonymous accounts. It bins all blockchain principles and is authoritarian even though it is for the good of national security.

Candlestick Arrangement

Bitcoin

As aforementioned and from previous BTC/USD trade plans, the rejection of higher highs right off the 38.2 percent Fibonacci retracement level hints of underlying bear momentum. Since none of our conservative trade conditions came to pass and bulls didn’t close above $4,500, we recommend patience aware that liquidation below $3,700 or Dec 28 bulls and bull flag base could lead to further drops to $3,220. Uncertainty reigns and to avoid the claws of bears, we suggest liquidating BTC holdings for stable coins while stepping up if prices drop below $3,700.

Technical Indicators

Jan 10 declines were at the back of above average volumes—35k versus 18k right off the 38.2 percent Fibonacci retracement level. Reversal at this level was significant. Any confirming drops below $3,700–even with light volumes, could lead to further drawn down in sync with Dec 20 high volume bear bar—117k versus 37k.

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China’s Internet Censor to Start Regulating Blockchain Firms Next Month

China’s internet censorship agency has approved a set of regulations for blockchain service providers in the country that will take effect in mid-February.

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) published its new “Regulation for Managing Blockchain Information Services” on Thursday, defining blockchain information service providers as “entities or nodes” that offer information services to the public using blockchain technology via desktop sites or mobile apps. The rules become official on February 15, according to the release.

Among the 23 articles listed in the document, one requires blockchain service providers to register with the CAC within 10 working days of starting to offer services to the public.

The agency also mandates that blockchain startups must register their names, service types, industry fields and server addresses. Further, it bans startups from using blockchain technology to “produce, duplicate, publish, and disseminate” information or content that is prohibited by Chinese laws.

If blockchain startups fail to comply with the rules, the CAC said it would first issue a warning, while failure to act within the specified timeline would bring a fine ranging from 5,000 yuan ($737) to 30,000 yuan ($4,422), depending upon the offense.

The CAC first published draft rules in October of last year. At that time, one of the articles also recommended that blockchain startups operating in fields such as news reporting, publishing, education and the pharmaceutical industry must also obtain licenses from relevant authorities prior to registration with the CAC. The final rules have dropped this article altogether.

Previously, blockchain technology has been utilized to bypass China’s strict internet censorship – often dubbed “The Great Firewall.” For example, as part of the #Metoo movement and a recent pharmaceutical scandal in the country, individuals posted information on the ethereum blockchain to avoid censorship.

China flags image via Shutterstock 

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Chinese Bank Giants Tap Blockchain in Trade Finance Efficiency Boost

The China Banking Association (CBA), the country’s self-regulatory organization for the banking sector, is launching a new blockchain-based platform for trade finance.

The platform was announced last week while the organization is in the process of rolling it out for live usage after several pilot programs aimed at improving the efficiency and security of trade finance transactions.

Over 10 major banks in the region have signed up for the platform, including HSBC (China), Bank of China, China Merchants Bank, Ping An Bank, China Postal Savings Bank, among others.

Lending technical support are Chinese fintech firms including PeerSafe, a Beijing-based startup focusing on distributed ledger technology and a member of the Hyperledger consortium.

The CBA said in the statement that it has completed two pilots for issuing a letter of credits (LoC) and asset-backed securities, with participation from the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China and China Merchants Bank.

“The launch of China’s trade finance blockchain has brought together the trade chain of different banks to make cross-bank transactions much faster, safer and more realistic,” Fang Xiao, vice president and head of industrial and commercial finance at HSBC China, was quoted as saying in a news report on Thursday.

Going forward, the CBA said it plans to include more small and medium-sized banks, as well as customs and taxation agencies to the platform.

The trade finance sector is increasingly looking to adopt blockchain technology for improved operations. In September, China’s central bank deployed the “Bay Area Trade Finance Blockchain Platform” across financial institutions in the southern city of Shenzhen.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority also announced the launch of a live blockchain trade finance platform in November last year.

More recently, HSBC India and ING Bank, Brussels, facilitated the trade finance transaction on R3’s Corda blockchain platform, for India-based oil and gas conglomerate Reliance Industries and US-based global chemical distributor Tricon Energy.

China financial district image via Shutterstock

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New Survey Finds 40% of Chinese Want To Invest In Bitcoin

A new survey asked nearly 5000 Chinese people about their familiarity and interest in cryptocurrency. The results of the survey show that two in five or 40 percent wanting to invest in bitcoin, despite the current bear market.


Subject Knowledge

The survey found that 98 percent of the respondents had heard of at least one concept related to cryptocurrency or blockchain.

Although, only 50 percent said they had heard of cryptocurrency, digital currency or bitcoin, and 42% had heard of blockchain. One would imagine a very high level of crossover in these two groups, so it is unclear what the other 48 percent had heard of.

Only 20% of those who have heard of blockchain claim to have an understanding of the technology. Half of these were millennials, suggesting a greater level of crypto-interest amongst this group.

Indeed, the affinity for digital payments among the millennial generation alongside a deep distrust in banks following the ’08 financial crisis may be setting the stage for Bitcoin adoption to happen naturally.

In November, Bitcoinist noted:

[I]n 8 years, there will be no person under 18 years old who have lived in a world without Bitcoin, which has been working flawlessly their whole lives. This will be the reality for everyone born in 2009 and beyond.

Their trust in bitcoin will be as profound as their trust in gravity.

Invested In Crypto

14 percent of survey respondents had invested in cryptocurrency. Of these, one in five have little knowledge and only know about Bitcoin, two in five know about mainstream cryptocurrencies like Ethereum and EOS, and two in five have knowledge of other altcoins.

China’s First Bitcoin Documentary Premiere

Influencers play an important role in the spread of cryptocurrency awareness. Nearly 40% of those polled had discovered crypto through online celebrities. 25 percent learned about crypto through friends and relatives, whilst 20 percent became aware through media coverage.

Age Appropriate

60 percent of those who had invested in cryptocurrency was in the 19-28 age range, with most having invested between 10,000 and 100,000 yuan ($1450 – $14,500). Most of this group invested after the 2017 bull-run, so will likely be nursing some major losses.

Despite this, 40 percent of the survey respondents said that they would invest any spare funds in cryptocurrency in the future.

Barriers To Entry

However, almost 60 percent of respondents said they were scared off by complicated procedures when using wallets or exchanges. A similar number believe that they don’t need crypto as a means of payment, due to existing mobile payment options being pervasive in the country.

Despite these misgivings and the ongoing legality issues, the survey claimed to be the largest of its kind, seems to indicate a bright future for crypto in China.

What do you think of the survey’s findings? Share your thoughts below! 


Images courtesy of Shutterstock